Fiverr is not interesting for new members!

#1
I signed up on fiverr almost three months ago and i had alot of good things heard about that system but when i created my first gig on fiverr regarding content writing and i found that no one had even been seeing my gig that was first thing on fiverr dissapointing new members when no one take a look at what you have prepared with very hard work.Because of all those old and senior fiverr monster who are always on the front and no one would ever wants to buy something from any new member.All i wanted was to have atleast some visitors so that i might be able to encourage myself to keep giging and working on no matter if something is sold or not atleast people are looking at my work and i am just gonna need the right buyer on the right time for my meterial to be sold out.
 
#2
Most job bidding sites provide ways for you to gain more exposure. Some have you pay to be a featured listing and some suggest you actively bid on jobs posted to their sites.

I was under the impression that Fiverr expects you to actively bid for jobs. Is this no longer true? Was it ever true?
 
#3
I'm not sure about that but all i know is i have not got any online work which is worthy to be called the replacement for the real job.I have been wondering around the internet for last 11 years to find some online jobs to make some extra cash for living but i have never got hit by any good things so far.But insanly i would always love to believe that there's still something out there people are making good money with.

  • Do not let your Hope goes down no matter what!
 
#4
One thing that you need to know about Fiverr is that most buyers are cheap. So if everyone else is offering a 500 word article for $5, try offering a 600 word article for $5. You are going to need to offer more in order to get noticed, and once you've established yourself you can drop down the word count.
 
#5
I think the other posters have given some great advice for new fiverr members who are just starting out. The idea is to basically increase your services exposure by offering something at a better price, which is a great way to start advertising your product or service!
 
#6
You're likely going to have to pay your dues nowadays. A few years ago having success on Fiverr was easy because there wasn't as much competition, but today everyone has something going on there. And as we've said before, one of the most important things is to get good feedback and to show that you've completed many orders, so hopefully after working hard to satisfy some buyers it will pay off in the end.
 
#7
I signed up on fiverr almost three months ago and i had alot of good things heard about that system but when i created my first gig on fiverr regarding content writing and i found that no one had even been seeing my gig that was first thing on fiverr dissapointing new members when no one take a look at what you have prepared with very hard work.Because of all those old and senior fiverr monster who are always on the front and no one would ever wants to buy something from any new member.All i wanted was to have atleast some visitors so that i might be able to encourage myself to keep giging and working on no matter if something is sold or not atleast people are looking at my work and i am just gonna need the right buyer on the right time for my meterial to be sold out.
Before I go on to what would be described as a rant, I'm not in anyway affiliated to Fiverr; also I think Fiverr sucks in many aspects. The Fiverr you see now is what Fiverr and enthusiasts label as the "FIVERR V2". Before this, Fiverr had a simple algorithm that was easily understood. Now, Fiverr is nightmarish--for everyone. Beginners rarely get views, and there are times when the oldies fall in ranking behind someone who they're better off. If you notice the recommended page of "writing" gigs for example, after the first two rows (at most), you find a lot of new gigs. This is one way Fiverr is trying to help new writers. Still, let's look deeper, in my experience as a freelance writer, roughly 80% of those in need of written content "want experienced professional writers", it's thus a long stretch to expect the remaining 20% to provide projects for the vast number of new writers. Browsing through the established freelance marketplaces that show statistics--I take Elance, Odesk and Freelancer as case studies--you'd find out that there are more sellers in the writer group than any other elite group of freelancers (other elite groups being programmers, designers, marketers). I'm of the opinion that it's the same on Fiverr, too many sellers, fewer buyers. Consequentially, it's difficult for Fiverr to provide projects for all newer writers at a time.

I got my first writing gig barely 12 hours after activating my gig, the second came in 24-hours later--there's no magic, I was lucky. (Maybe the fact that I only offered gigs after Fiverr sent me a mail reminding me that I had an account and had published no gigs, was the reason I got much exposure and a follow-up order a few hours after publishing a gig). In recent times however, the momentum has slowed down to naught, I've had no new view in over a week now. I did the trouble to research why, and came to the (annoying or comforting, you tell me) conclusion that gigs exposures are rotated. According to Fiverr, it's the only way to be fair and I agree so: but with only about 4 orders, I'm no where to be found in any page--recommended, express or highest rating (*smirk* who am I kidding to be in this page).

Old sellers would always get more orders (you'd literally drool at the amount of orders they have in line, which is way more than the views you've raked in a fortnight) and more exposure: they've earned it. As new sellers, it's about increasing your exposure and fighting hard. I'm not successful yet on Fiverr, I prefer to be a testimony of my convictions before I go about telling others what works. However, if you don't mind, I'd go far to tell you what I know on how to bleep the huge roadblocks on Fiverr, and have multiple orders rolling in.

Most job bidding sites provide ways for you to gain more exposure. Some have you pay to be a featured listing and some suggest you actively bid on jobs posted to their sites.
I was under the impression that Fiverr expects you to actively bid for jobs. Is this no longer true? Was it ever true?
This discussion is about Fiverr. Personally, my face turns red with fury when for a reason I find myself in a bidding site. True they work for many, and when you have a good reputation you literally would have more than you can handle. But the growth process is steep. Recently, I had to bid for a project in one of these "job bidding sites", and I found myself about to submit a proposal same as about 3 established print writers with between 5 & over a decade of writing and publishing to their names, one of them is a native writer who has an English major. I knew I was in the wrong place, because I sure as hell am not going to bid with a rate lower than minimum wage just to have an edge over writers with scary qualifications. Add to that, I had a few free proposals left, the bulk I've used already without success.

It'll astonish you to know that, all my leads from the bidding site has been from clients who checked out my profile and got in touch with me through the messaging system. Fiverr still lets you bid, when you get to level 1 that is.

I'm not sure about that but all i know is i have not got any online work which is worthy to be called the replacement for the real job.I have been wondering around the internet for last 11 years to find some online jobs to make some extra cash for living but i have never got hit by any good things so far.But insanly i would always love to believe that there's still something out there people are making good money with.
  • Do not let your Hope goes down no matter what!
11 years? Man, that's a long time off, way before Facebook, Twitter, Fiverr, DigitalPoint (you name it?) got on the radar. I've been on since 2009. Between then and now, I've known of a lot of success stories (I'm not talking $3,196,345-in-a-month-using-IM-secret kind of success, I'm talking the real kind), but I'm still carving out mine. You can make good money online, unfortunately there're actually a lot that go with it. Trying to earn online is like swimming through a school of hungry piranhas to discovering the lost mythical city of Eldorado.
 
#8
One thing that you need to know about Fiverr is that most buyers are cheap. So if everyone else is offering a 500 word article for $5, try offering a 600 word article for $5. You are going to need to offer more in order to get noticed, and once you've established yourself you can drop down the word count.

I offer 250 words for $5 and I had a 40% conversion rate before Fiverr pulled the blinds on my writing gig. There's a top level seller that offer 100 words for $5 and always have tens of orders piled up. In contrast, there are those offering 800 words per 5$, 500 x2 articles for $5 enjoying the attention and patronage that comes with entering Level 2. My point is, as much as it makes sense to a new seller to lower rates to get more business, there should be a limit to it. Many top written content sellers on Fiverr with an average of 500 words/5$($4 really), are actually writing agencies that have promoters, marketers, editors, proof-readers, writers and maybe affiliates in the works. Down the ladder, writers are paid $2-3 per 500 words. I know of writers (99.99% Asians) who write for $1.5 per 500 words, and regrettably sellers who think it's treason to offer more than that. [Remember my "piranha" illustration]. Of course, these articles are churned out within 30 minutes or less, often spinners and plagiarism are used to keep up with demand.

All this goes to show is that, you can never really lower your rates enough and get ahead, there's always someone who has gone lower than you and is presently enjoying better sales. Slap on that the reality that as long as there are cheap writers to offer cheap rates, there'd be cheap buyers who'd insult you for asking higher (I've been asked by a buyer to tell the difference between a $5 article and a $50 article, I did not bother to explain because I'd be spending minutes I wouldn't get back to a daft who would receive my words through one ear and out the other). The only people that would understand are those who sell themselves for what extremists would call "slave rates".

It is in your best interest to offer rates that you're comfortable with--$5 for 500 words is not reasonable for a New Yorker or Londoner (no matter how much we sugar-coat the storyline)--and then aim to retain the clients that pay for the rate you are comfortable with. Furthermore, if you aim to have a writing career or earn a substantive amount of money from writing (thus taking it as a profession), you should seriously look into writing for projects in your native location. As a native speaker, that would mean you seeking out businesses and corporations that would need your services (I frown when I see native speakers selling themselves for any less that 2 cents per word irrespective of experience). Conversly, one should note the business targeted, if you're targeting the numerous IMers with tens of web 2.0 websites or blogs needing content that's not exactly aimed at intelligent readers or customers, don't expect them to shell any more than $5 per article (300-750 words). They'd usually need about five or more articles monthly or thereabout on each website in different rich keyword niches, as such $25 per 500 word articles is not just way out of their budget, but also way out of their league. I'm blunt when I say, they don't need it. You are what you attract, so give writing a lot of thought, factor all of this in before taking the plunge.

In conclusion, to make a living out of writing or have a noteworthy writing career you should do most of the following:

  • Have a strong LinkedIn profile. Your photos, education, work history, fully descriptive writing interest etc. are all needed. Read around on how to build a game-changing profile.
  • Have a strong media presence. Your Facebook account is not just meant to share philosophical quotes to get likes, just as your twitter account is not to share your eating routine. You should be willing to imbibe the spirit of professionalism and have more of clients, fellow professionals [to build profitable networks] as friends, followers or subscribers.
  • Network yourself. This continues from the previous bullet-point, become friends with fellow writers (the closer they are to you geographically the better), join LinkedIn groups, Facebook pages/groups, follow twitter handles that get you closer with clients or writers' resources or fellow writers. You'd be missing out on big-paying work, potential partners and clients if you stay back and rely solely on Fiverr or some micro jobbing site.
  • Join forums. Forums are communities, pick one or two with theme(s) that appeal to you, then try to build a reputation in them. Be willing to help others (it's all in Karma), and be active. Forums usually have all of it, clients, fellow writers in different niches and specialties, important resources, big leads etc.
  • Run your own website or blog. Usually writers are advised to have their own websites where their services are outlined with a great sales pitch. Add to that contact information, a viable portfolio of the best of their writing, SEO; and you should be just fine. I advice to take that farther, write continually--your static website even with the best SEO would rank low--on issues that you're passionate about (writing based on your passion usually brings out the best in you). It doesn't have to be everyday, but it should be several times a month (don't be rigid tho', there may be months when you don't have much time for yourself).
  • Try to get featured in authority websites. If you are a Forbes' contributor, I don't know any finance-oriented website that wouldn't stay on your CV or proposal a little longer than usual. Thankfully, there are a lot of them out there, your name and if possible photo should be on them. They are the selling point in your "About me" essay.
  • Market yourself. And I mean this in every legal way under the sun. Both offline and online, market yourself as a writer. It doesn't matter if you're a paramedic with a 9-5 job, if you've been paid or have gotten something of value for writing (or more importantly want to have a writing career); let people know you as someone with an above average writing skill. Flyers, putting ads in papers, may be the extreme of it (usually undertaken only by those who pay most of their bills from writing); however, spread the word, make calls to businesses, visit their offices: just don't sit at home and expect orders to roll in. While online, join sites like--yes I'll say it--Fiverr, Freelancer, Odesk, Elance, PeoplePerHour. Make your profiles stand out, be online as much as you can, be responsive and courteous.

These are the important ones, there are more to do; giving credence to the premise that you can be all you can be if you work hard enough and are willing to do what you have to. Many writers do not do all in this list, yet can boast of 5 digits annual income. I don't know of any who has done all this and does not make reasonable income (reasonable may not mean satisfying, but reasonable is better than nothing or below par).

 
#9
I offer 250 words for $5 and I had a 40% conversion rate before Fiverr pulled the blinds on my writing gig. There's a top level seller that offer 100 words for $5 and always have tens of orders piled up. In contrast, there are those offering 800 words per 5$, 500 x2 articles for $5 enjoying the attention and patronage that comes with entering Level 2. My point is, as much as it makes sense to a new seller to lower rates to get more business, there should be a limit to it. Many top written content sellers on Fiverr with an average of 500 words/5$($4 really), are actually writing agencies that have promoters, marketers, editors, proof-readers, writers and maybe affiliates in the works. Down the ladder, writers are paid $2-3 per 500 words. I know of writers (99.99% Asians) who write for $1.5 per 500 words, and regrettably sellers who think it's treason to offer more than that. [Remember my "piranha" illustration]. Of course, these articles are churned out within 30 minutes or less, often spinners and plagiarism are used to keep up with demand.
I wasn't recommending for someone to do this permanently, I was suggesting it for them to get some good reviews and buyers and then decreasing the word count.
 
#10
I wasn't recommending for someone to do this permanently, I was suggesting it for them to get some good reviews and buyers and then decreasing the word count.
Honestly., that's how I got work now. It worked. May be temporary, but that's still a blessing. And online work is like investment- you shouldn't put all your eggs in one basket. I'm certainly going to enjoy Fiverr while I can, while not relying solely on it.
And yes, working online isn't particularly peachy right now, it's hard work and it takes time...but then again, so is the job market. I know people who work for almost nothing and still cannot quit, because they have nothing better, and loans to pay.

11 years? Man, that's a long time off, way before Facebook, Twitter, Fiverr, DigitalPoint (you name it?) got on the radar. I've been on since 2009. Between then and now, I've known of a lot of success stories (I'm not talking $3,196,345-in-a-month-using-IM-secret kind of success, I'm talking the real kind), but I'm still carving out mine. You can make good money online, unfortunately there're actually a lot that go with it. Trying to earn online is like swimming through a school of hungry piranhas to discovering the lost mythical city of Eldorado.
You have good tips in the second post. But 11 years is quite a long time, as you said. If I may, no offense to anyone, work is hard anywhere. The internet is the "gold-digging" of this century, people expect to somehow manage doing less and getting more money, when in fact establishing yourself online takes a lot more- simply because you are competing with a lot more people. With the exception of being born rich or inheriting that, there are no shortcuts. However earning good online is highly relative to where you live and the amount of money you need for said good living. But if you are struggling at the same level at which you were few years back, perhaps you need to revisit your strategy. The internet evolves and so should all of us trying to work on it.
It's pretty much like any other job, with the exception that you have to figure out the rules for yourself, rather than knowing the exact qualifications etc. to earn from a job.
 
#11
I understand what OldSteak is talking about and ideally a person doesn't want to undersell their writing services; especially if they're a good writer. I'm seriously considering taking my writing gig off of fiverr for this reason because after my first experience with one buyer it appears that some of the buyers are just looking to get extremely high-quality writing for dirt cheap. Here's a link that gives you an idea of what freelance writer's charge and they're far from cheap!
http://www.njcreatives.org/membership/120-how-much-should-i-charge.html
 
#12
I understand what OldSteak is talking about and ideally a person doesn't want to undersell their writing services; especially if they're a good writer. I'm seriously considering taking my writing gig off of fiverr for this reason because after my first experience with one buyer it appears that some of the buyers are just looking to get extremely high-quality writing for dirt cheap. Here's a link that gives you an idea of what freelance writer's charge and they're far from cheap!
http://www.njcreatives.org/membership/120-how-much-should-i-charge.html
Well to be honest, Fiverr is not a place where anyone should go to write. I mean getting $4 to write a few hundred words is ridiculous, but Fiverr isn't a place where most sellers go to get rich, they go there because they're desperate for some income. Some get lucky and make a good income, but I don't think any of those people would be writers, because writing takes times and it's really easy to burn out. But...some people use it as a way to get experience, get fast cash, and to even get in contact with some clients that they can personally contact at a later date with updated prices.
 
#13
I think that you made some excellent points, Hank. That's basically why I placed a gig on fiverr was to make some contacts for my writing. Probably the biggest issue with writing, too, is that you can kick out a 300-500 word article fairly quickly, but then good writer's are going to do plenty of editing to clean the article or whatever it is they're writing up and that is time consuming.

Anyone who writes knows that there are plenty of times where you just need to set your work aside for a while or even a day or two so that your focus is better. I've had many a nights where I'm practically falling asleep at my computer and just say that's it I have to set whatever I'm writing aside for a while and come back to it later.
 
#14
It is common with such sites that the big fish will always come first. People who have done more work on the site, will always have their profiles and gigs put on the homepage. But do not give up. Promote your gigs through social media sites and you might just get yourself a gig soon than you think.
 
#15
Good luck. It's always a bit tricky to be able to break out when there are others who are more experienced and who have more feedback than you do. Once you get someone to take a chance on you, though, you'll be able to shine. Just keep trying; you'll get there sometime.
 
#16
Well to be honest, Fiverr is not a place where anyone should go to write. I mean getting $4 to write a few hundred words is ridiculous, but Fiverr isn't a place where most sellers go to get rich, they go there because they're desperate for some income. Some get lucky and make a good income, but I don't think any of those people would be writers, because writing takes times and it's really easy to burn out. But...some people use it as a way to get experience, get fast cash, and to even get in contact with some clients that they can personally contact at a later date with updated prices.
Yeah, there is something to that. I'm writing on fiverr until I organize my other internet ventures better. That said, fiverr income is basically saving my month now. Especially that I have debt to pay off and in this past month has been the first time in a while I've been able to pay off a part of it. However much I can make on fiverr now, it's making my life easier, which is priceless. Laying in bed/researching on google/going from ad to ad wondering how to get extra cash without working 24/7 is frankly painful, and I'm happy I've got fiverr so lessen that burden now. There aren't that many jobs you can do for few hours in the middle of the night or whenever you get a chance.
 
#17
Probably the biggest issue with writing, too, is that you can kick out a 300-500 word article fairly quickly
I, like you, can write fairly quickly about a topic that I know a lot about, but I find that more and more people are going after difficult niches lately, which requires me to research a heck of a lot more. I miss the days when everyone and their uncle were going after the weight loss niche, because I could kick out an article about weight loss in about ten minutes.
 
#18
You need to review your gig and make sure you included the right tags. Also posting a video increases your chances of getting noticed. You can get a video done by some sellers on fiverr.